COMPLEX MOVEMENTS



Complex Movements is a Detroit-based artist collective composed of graphic designer/fine artist Wesley Taylor, music producer/filmmaker Waajeed and hip-hop lyricist/activist Invincible, with creative technologist Carlos (L05) Garcia. Their multimedia performance installations, hand crafted songs and trans-genre experiments explore the relationship between complex science and social justice movements. Complex Movements is a recipient of a 2012 MAP Fund grant, Michigan ArtServe/Creative Many’s CSA project and winner of ArtPrize’s juried time-based performance category. They have presented their work at The Detroit Science Center for Kresge’s Art X Detroit festival, Re:View Gallery, the Network of Ensemble Theater’s Microfest, Cranbrook Art Museum and SiTE:LAB at the old Grand Rapid’s Public Museum. 


Carlos “L05” Garcia is a multimedia artist and performer from Ann Arbor, MI. As Complex Movement’s lead technologist, he brings an extensive range of experience in a number of skill areas, including computer programming, projection mapping, audio and video production, interactive performance technologies, improvisational and choreographic dance, and more. Carlos is a vocalist and producer with the hip hop/electronic duo Celsius Electronics and has both performed live and appeared on recordings with numerous Michigan-based and national touring acts. In addition to his multimedia performance and engineering endeavors, Carlos supervises the GroundWorks Media Lab at the University of Michigan, where he received an undergraduate degree in Performing Arts Technology (Engineering Concentration) and currently acts as a member of the Emerging Technology Group.

Invincible’s spitfire wordplay has received acclaim from fans all across the world, while their active involvement in progressive social change has taken their music beyond entertainment toward actualizing the change they wish to see. As a co-founder of EMERGENCE Media, they released their debut album ShapeShifters(2008) and produced award winning videos like The Revival (2009, about women in hip-hop) and Locusts (2008, exploring displacement and gentrification in Detroit). They have performed on stages and in clubs, community centers, campuses, pride celebrations, and festivals around the world for over a decade, both as a solo artist, and featured as part of the anti-misogyny Hip-Hop collective ANOMOLIES. They teamed up with longtime producer Waajeed in 2010 to release a limited edition 7” single Detroit Summer/Emergence. Invincible is a fellow of Kresge Arts in Detroit, and the Ellen Stone Belic Institute for Women and Gender in the Arts and Media. In addition to their work as a performing artist, for the last decade Invincible has worked with Detroit Summer, a multi-racial, inter-generational collective in Detroit that is transforming communities through youth facilitative leadership, creativity and collective action. They were also the co-coordinator and co-founder of the Detroit Future Youth network to support social justice and media-based youth projects throughout the city.

Wesley Taylor is a graphic designer, fine artist, musician and curator. He has spent many years “scene building” in the Detroit hip-hop community as both an emcee and graphic designer. He is co-founder of Emergence Media, along with Invincible. Taylor’s most recent body of work revolves around the promise of the future; he imagines that “the future” is his client and he is in change of marketing for “the future” and branding its many possibilities. In 2011, his work was presented in the two-person show Brandished at Re:View Gallery in Detroit. Taylor holds a graduate degree in 2-D Design from Cranbrook Academy of Art and teaches design at Eastern Michigan University. He also manages a five-person artists’ studio collective in Detroit called Talking Dolls.

The story of Waajeed is a Detroit story. In the shadows of a towering Motown legacy, and under the tutelage of electronic heroes of Detroit techno, Waajeed would find his calling card in hip-hop. Along with luminaries and comrades like J Dilla and Slum Village, he would help pioneer a distinct sound in hip hop which continues to inform a generation of beat-builders worldwide. From dusty stacks of hallowed Motown wax, samples would be flipped, jewels would be dropped, and history would be written. After years of championing this beat movement through personal projects, concept groups such as Platinum Pied Pipers, a stellar resume of collaborations, and his own Bling47 label, Waajeed looks to pivot forward in a new direction, with his Detroit techno roots as the catalyst. Crafting a new sound and energy, Waajeed looks to further inform the next wave of beat junkies.